Photo of Sky Christopherson: Beatrice De Gea, New York Times

Photo of Sky Christopherson: Beatrice De Gea, New York Times

With the hundreds of trackers and monitors in the health technology market today, this session will showcase the ones that are beautifully designed and most effective.
— Health 2.0 Featured Demos, San Francisco, CA

Wednesday October 7th, 2015. San Francisco, CA.

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Chelsea Clinton opened the 9th Annual Health 2.0 Conference in San Francisco, CA to an audience of over 2,100 attendees comprised of leading health care industry professionals, companies, and innovators.

Olympic athlete and health innovator Sky Christopherson (ranked 5th in a recent national 40 under 40) gave a sneak-peek of his company OAthlete's upcoming 2017 app based on work done with Olympic athletes (mentioned in a FORBES tech feature). The demo was presented on the closing day of the conference in a session dedicated to the 5 hottest new apps out of 220 submissions in health and fitness.

The session was titled: “Measured from Head to Toe:  With the hundreds of trackers and monitors in the health technology market today, this session will showcase the ones that are beautifully designed and most effective."  

On stage, Sky Christopherson said the upcoming app will "Finally give us an answer to the question we, as high performers, ask ourselves daily: What should we do and when?" The presentation noted that current apps are designed around linear feeds of data such as calories in, calories out, total steps, total sleep, missing the most powerful benefit to users; Timing. "We're biological beings built on a 24 hour cycle, so timing and interconnectedness is key".

He gave a sneak-peek of the app, "This consumer app will support the way we actually experience our day, making it simple to plan, track, and get instant data-driven feedback on the timing of key decisions we, as unique individuals, make daily that have the most powerful top-down impact on our health and performance." 

The goal of the app is to "make technology more widely accessible that helped athletes win 5 Olympic medals using an individualized approach called 'Data not Drugs'." Sky added that an upcoming feature length film (recently reviewed by Sports Illustrated) gives a behind-the-scenes look into how the project began to help the U.S. Women's Track Cycling Team, who had become America's medal hope when Lance Armstrong and teammates were banned for drugs just months before the 2012 London Olympics.

The 'Data not Drugs' software has since been applied to a variety of athlete and non-athlete use cases, and 2016 will see the full release of the software along with a growing ecosystem of cutting-edge sensors through partner companies. The OAthlete team also includes Olympic ambassador Tamara Christopherson, founding advisor and Olympian Adam Laurent, technical co-founder Dan Harms, and a world-class advisory board, including the project's initial inspiration Dr. Eric Topol.

Sky closed the demo with a big-data visualization via current partner company Datameer and added "With the prospect of a home Olympics in Los Angeles in 2024, we will continue working with Olympic athletes for discovery and validation, and invite further industry collaboration as we build toward a future with more data and less drugs in sport, and in health."

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